Ms. Moriarty produced her client’s tax returns a week later. When I entered his office, Holt was looking at them with a magnifying glass he kept in his desk drawer to look for clues in the fine print.

“Ah, Dr. Wright, I think we have solved this case. It seems there was a good reason for holding back the wife’s tax returns. I had several hypotheses going. Among them was speculation that she was getting income as gifts or trust funds from her Daddy or Granddaddy. But it turns out there are no trusts or gifts.”

“Then what is the solution, pray tell, Holt?”

Holt made a steeple with his hands and said, “When you have eliminated all other possibilities, the one that remains, no matter how improbable, is the correct solution.”

“So what is the correct solution?” I asked.

“Elementary, my dear Wright.”

Holt handed me the magnifying glass and the wife’s 2019 tax return. She had filed separately from the husband. The return listed her occupation as Software Architect. Holt  told me she was employed by Apple. Then Holt pointed at the line for her income:  $250,000.

“She makes more than he makes!” I uttered excitedly.

The wife dropped her alimony claim the next day.